Cancer Keys: Salty Foods and Stomach Cancer Risk

Cancer Keys: Salty Foods and Stomach Cancer Risk

Latest articles:Eating too many foods that are high in salt such as salted meat, brined fish and pickled vegetables can increase the risk of stomach cancer. Higher rates of stomach cancer are found in countries like Japan and Korea, than in the UK, where these foods...

read more
Cancer Keys: RUQ Pain in Pancreatic Cancer

Cancer Keys: RUQ Pain in Pancreatic Cancer

Latest articles: Pancreatic cancer diagnoses can be missed due to the non-site specific nature of some early symptoms. However, according to CRUK, up to 70% of patients with pancreatic cancer initially visit the doctor with upper abdominal or back pain. Potential...

read more

GatewayC’s Top Tips from 2019

Monday 30th December 2019

With 2019 drawing to a close, we’ve rounded up some of the most popular tips from GatewayC this year, based on our users’ comments and feedback. Take a look below!

 

Chest x-rays aren’t as accurate as you may think…

NICE consulted on the guidelines recommending chest x-rays in suspected lung cancer cases earlier this year, since negative chest x-rays do not always exclude a diagnosis of lung cancer (with a false negative rate of around 20%). Review our quick Cancer Key on proceeding with investigations after a negative chest x-ray.

 

Dear Diary, today my bowels were…

With lots of vague bowel symptoms presenting in clinic, many of you enjoyed the Symptom Diary from Bowel Cancer UK developed by patient Beth that featured in our recent FIT course. Help patients track non-site specific symptoms and spot red-flags so other bowel conditions can be ruled out in investigations – see what the diary looks like here.

 

Assessing headaches doesn’t have to give you one!

Everyone knows headaches are a commonly presented symptom, but did you know that patients with brain tumours often don’t present with an isolated headache until a later stage, if at all? Many of you enjoyed reviewing our information on the classification of migraines, associated symptoms connected to raised intracranial pressure and visual field defects in our brain tumour course – view it here.

 

PSA on the rise!

With a sharp rise in PSA requests following plenty of media coverage this year, our PSA course has been one of our most popular to date. Supported by Prostate Cancer UK, it equips health practitioners in delicately discussing the pros and cons of PSA testing with asymptomatic patients. You told us this course increased your confidence in managing PSA requests – refresh your knowledge here.

 

Looking for more?

See all our Cancer Keys and blogs here.

Find our full list of available courses here.

Keep up to date: Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn