25% of lung cancers report as a false negative chest X-ray

12th August 2021

Approximately 25% of lung cancer cases can be missed due to false-negative chest X-ray results. This often leads to a delay in diagnosis and can result in a worse prognosis for the patient.

If there are still suspicions of lung cancer following a normal chest X-ray result, the patient should be referred for a CT scan or as a suspected cancer referral to rule out the possibly of lung cancer.

In GatewayC’s ‘Lung Cancer – Early Diagnosis course’, Dr Matthew Evison, Consultant Chest Physician, discusses the sensitivity of chest X-rays and how reliable they are for diagnosing lung cancer.

Find out more:

  • Access GatewayC’s ‘Lung Cancer – Early Diagnosis’ course here
  • Read BJGP: Sensitivity of chest X-ray for detecting lung cancer in people presenting with symptoms: a systematic review here

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