Cancer Keys: Prostate cancer and nocturia

Many men with early prostate cancer don’t have any obvious signs or symptoms. However, early symptoms can present if the cancer grows near the urethra and presses against it, changing urination.

Potential pitfall

Prostate cancer is predominately a disease that affects the ageing population, with patients experiencing benign changes, such as nocturia, as part of the ageing process of the prostate gland. Therefore, it can be difficult to distinguish whether there is an underlying cause for concern.

Helpful hint

NICE NG12 guidelines advise consideration of a PSA test and digital rectal examination in men with any lower urinary tract symptoms. Patients should be referred on suspected cancer pathway if their prostate feels malignant on digital rectal examination or if PSA levels are above the age-specific reference range.

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Visit GatewayC’s Prostate cancer – Responding to a PSA screening request here.

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