Supporting patients with impotence: 3 questions to ask

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Infection prevention for cancer patients

Infection prevention for cancer patients

Friday 6th March 2020 With COVID-19 hitting the headlines this week, the public are being advised to take infection prevention measures, such as thorough hand washing and covering coughs and sneezes. People affected by cancer, especially certain types such as...

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Cancer Keys: Cancer and Dyspepsia

Cancer Keys: Cancer and Dyspepsia

Whilst dyspepsia is commonplace in general practice, it can sometimes be an indicator of stomach or oesophageal cancers. Potential pitfall: Typically, dyspepsia may be associated with common and less serious triggers such as lifestyle factors or stress. With patients...

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Besides a lump, pruritus (or itching) can be another associated symptom of lymphoma.

Potential Pitfall

It is easy to associate pruritus with a less serious condition because of how general this symptom is. Furthermore, usually the itching does not usually present with an obvious rash, but it is important to investigate the nature of this symptom in the context of the patient’s wider condition.

Helpful hint

NICE NG12 guidelines advise the need to investigate other symptoms in conjunction with pruritus, particularly unexplained lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly, when making a suspected cancer referral. Additional symptoms to consider can include night sweats, fever, shortness of breath and weight loss.

Cancer Keys are brought to you by GatewayC.

Download the Cancer Key here.

Visit GatewayC’s Lymphoma – Early Diagnosis course here.

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Besides a lump, pruritus (or itching) can be another associated symptom of lymphoma.

Potential Pitfall

It is easy to associate pruritus with a less serious condition because of how general this symptom is. Furthermore, usually the itching does not usually present with an obvious rash, but it is important to investigate the nature of this symptom in the context of the patient’s wider condition.

Helpful hint

NICE NG12 guidelines advise the need to investigate other symptoms in conjunction with pruritus, particularly unexplained lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly, when making a suspected cancer referral. Additional symptoms to consider can include night sweats, fever, shortness of breath and weight loss.

Cancer Keys are brought to you by GatewayC.

Download the Cancer Key here.

Visit GatewayC’s Lymphoma – Early Diagnosis course here.

LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

Latest from the Blog

Infection prevention for cancer patients

Infection prevention for cancer patients

Friday 6th March 2020 With COVID-19 hitting the headlines this week, the public are being advised to take infection prevention measures, such as thorough hand washing and covering coughs and sneezes. People affected by cancer, especially certain types such as...

read more
Cancer Keys: Cancer and Dyspepsia

Cancer Keys: Cancer and Dyspepsia

Whilst dyspepsia is commonplace in general practice, it can sometimes be an indicator of stomach or oesophageal cancers. Potential pitfall: Typically, dyspepsia may be associated with common and less serious triggers such as lifestyle factors or stress. With patients...

read more

Related Posts

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.